What is GP?

Hi, I am new here today and slowly reading through the discussions. i have not met anyone in my life with my GI problems- or with chronic intestinal obstruction. I see alot of people have GP. What is this condition?

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hello & welcome to the boards -
GP is gastroparesis, which literally means stomach paralysis, though is used to described any instance where one's stomach has slower-than-normal motility (as opposed to just cases of total paralysis). if you're familiar with chronic intestinal obstruction GP is in some ways considered to be the equivalent in the stomach (as opposed to in the intestines.)

i'm sure that you will find others here who have similar, if not the same, GI issues. personally i have severe/ total GP (aka total stomach paralysis) as well as CIP (chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction) that are both due to my underlying diagnosis/ pathology of autonomic failure/ progressive autonomic neuropathy.

hope this helps,
:-)melissa in ohio

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Camea:

Welcome to the group! You will find plenty of people with dysmotility throughout their GI system. Many of us (including myself), have it throughout the GI system. It's nice to have people understand what you are going through!

Mimi

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Hi Melissa, Thanks for this, i am starting to learn so much already. I don't know anyone in New Zealand with my GI troubles, and it seems neither do the Dr's! So it will be great to learn so much. How do they make a diangnoses of GP? I have had tranzit studies that show extremely slow tranzit. I have had Osophagus manomerty and this showed very slow and poor co ordinated motility (I largely rely on gravity to get from throat to tummy- plus I had hiatus hernia repair age 16yrs). In NZ they dont do much more testing then this, so I ended up having a small intestine manometry & biopsy in Sweden. This showed that I have CIP. I also had a LACE stoma for a while (to irrigate) fror constipations- but that didn't work, it just back fired out- so we closed it. So now I'm wondering how do they test the emptying in your stomache? I know when I had a biopsy once the GI said my meal from the night before was completely un digested and in my stomache. It just seems like no one here knows about these conditions. There are some children diagnosed in NZ with CIP who cannot eat at all, and they seem easy to diagnose, but I can tolerate food, although now I am wondering if all my years of sickness are septic issues? I have had many severe illness times where they decided I had a bug or virus, but it sounds imilar to septic shock. However I survived them so can't have been so bad? Sorry for so much writing i feel like i am finally among people who can answer my life time of questions. Thank you!

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Hi Mimi, thanks for your welcome. I look forward to understanding my illness more, and hopefully support others. it sounds like i will be the least knowlegeable though being from such a small country, new Zealand!.

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Gastroparesis is paralysis or slowing of the processing of food through the lower esophagus and stomach due to damage to the vagus nerve caused by high blood sugar, surgery, a virus, or (for a lot of us) and unknown cause. It does not mean that you will eventually need a feeding tube. The prognosis is not definitive either way. It does mean you need to control your diet and become educated about meeting nutritional needs through a low-bulk, low-fiber diet and supplements. It is not pleasant, but it can be somewhat managed. At least, here, there are other people for whom this is normal. They can understand why a can of Pringles doesn't bother me, but an apple can make me miserable for days. Really, I have found so many new foods that I am going to try in just this past week, I am encouraged. NIH has good information on this, and I hear that NORD (National Organization for Rare Diseases) does also.
Hang in there!

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Thanks for this. So how do they diagnose GP? I undertsnad re diet. I have a very restricted diet- and certainly know if I push the limits or eat something in error. I am totally gluten free, and like you have odd things I can and can't eat including NO apples! I will look up the places you suggested re diet. Thanks

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I had an upper GI, where they found a grilled cheese sandwich (and accused me of not fasting). When they finally believed I had fasted LONGER than twelve hours, I had a nuclear study. In my case, I got to eat a nuclear hard-boiled egg, and they watched it go through my system. I did not glow green, but the doctor did remind my of the one in "Back to the Future". The nuclear study is supposed to be the definitive test. The egg was not bad, other than coming in a bag marked "biohazard". Actually, it was painless--and rather amusing with the cast of characters involved.
I then found a GI (from India, I think) who actively gave good nutritional counseling with a minimal meds approach. I often find that my eastern doctors are better with these things for some reason. I live in a very international area. Sometimes, foreign doctors relate to their patients much more personally--and listen better. My neurologist was also like this. Otherwise, I go to females who seem to also trust the patient more, or doctors with unusual personalities (the mad scientist, the slightly germophobic, the unpredictable hair color). I have no data on this working, but my family has seen a lot of doctors.
One of my favorite doctors, from South America, told me that most doctors treat horses. I would need to look for a doctor who preferred to treat zebras. Sorry. One too many bad experiences--and you start to notice a trend.
Gee, this veered off into a lecture. Blame it on the flu.

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Ok thanks, yes I have had the test with the egg. I was told from the markers (xrayed over 3 days) I has extremely slow transit- still markers in be on the 3rd day. But they never called it GP or any other name- just slow gastric emptying. Its nice to have a name for it and I will mention to my Dr.

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Hi Camea:

I love New Zealand! I went there in 2001 right after 9/11. I was living in NYC at the time so it was so nice to get out of the city. I only went to Auckland (and surrounding area) because I primarily went to Australia for a medical conference. But I wanted to see at least part of New Zealand too. What an incredibly beautiful country!

The gastric emptying study is primarily what is used here to diagnose GP. But many of us, like yourself, were first diagnosed during an endoscopy (with undigested food in our stomach).

Good luck - we are here for support if you need it!

Mimi

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Yes nZ is a beautiful country, i'm sure you will get back here some day.
I just read your profile so now understand how your journey has been- wow! Pretty serious and long haul for you. I sure hope this more settled time continues.

:0)

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Welcome to the board. You should check out: http://www.g-pact.org There is a lot of helpful information there and stories about those of us who have GP. You can read about me under the Spring 2008 Spotlight patient. I wish you all the best. This has been a very difficult illness for me. I hope yours is manageable with diet. I was able to use the GP diet for about 6 years before my symptoms got so bad and my intestines quit working too. Good luck to you. Hang in there and know that you are not alone.

-Jen

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Thanks Jen for this message. I did chack out the g-pact org, it is great thanks for the link. I feel happy to be in among others like me, yet at the same time it adds to the reality. How did you get on being pregnant while unwell?

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I too suffer with CIP, very frequent boughts of it. I too suffer from gastroparesis which they found after the chronic psuedos. I spent most of the winter well from Nov to Jan in and out of the hospital with the ng tube and the whole nine. I f I can be of help to you I'll sure try. Good luck-Kerriann

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Thanks Kerri-ann. I dont understand how I have avoided hospitals given i have diagnoses of CIP. Having said that- I've been taken to hospital a few times very ill- and they always say its a bad virus. Now when i get that sick again like I feel mt days are over, I will say- 'I have CIP'. Up to now from what I gather they only see CIP as people who can never eat. But biopsy in Sweden showed through tests of my ganglion cells that I have CIP, plus the manometry. I think back and everyone always tells me i'm too skinny and look saick- but I just got used to it. Anyway- this group is teaching me to speak up for myself. As to the GP, they never said the name to me, just very slow transit. Now I know why I feel like my dinner is in my mouth each morning and like I'm shattered!

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That's exactally why you feel your dinner in the morning. It's gp=slow traansit of stomach through the entire track, well I have it throughout the entire small intestine. They just never attached a name to your slow motility. Good Luck-Kerriann

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I too have CIP and I assume that gp pretty much goes along with it soon or later. Sounds like you could have been born with CIP. I wonder. I think I was but can't be certain since they didn't know anything about it then.

I am glad you finally found someone who understands and a place for good information. I have learned so much and hopefully have added some...if just a little... information for some. Hopefully, anyway.

From what information you have given, I would suspect you have gp. I have never heard anything of such a thing either until I got on this site. I got on here for CIP and found so many with gp and could totally relate and remember what drs. have told me over the years...just didnt' put a name to it.

Hope you find someone who can help you. I recently moved and haven't been able to find anyone knowledgable of CIIP. I have an appt with a new dr. in March but don't know if she will be able to help. My GCP set up the appt. and she doesn't know anything about CIP! Who knows.

I get my Domperidone from New Zealand. That is the cheapest place I have found for the medication. I think I read somewhere that you take Domperidone and Reglan. ? Be careful with the Reglan. Many on here have had problems with Reglan...including me.

Take Care,
Loie

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Yes I too think I was born with it. I always had gut issues, for as long as I recall- and even in my baby book there is mention of constipation and giving me brown sugar in the milk to help me go! I take domperidone (that is motilium right?) not reglan. thanks for the tip.
Camea

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Yes, Motilium is Domperidone. Hope you have a good week.

Take Care of You,
Loie

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I think I will have a good week thanks- I have really changed my food and drink intake since joining the group and feel better already. Still pain but not gluggy blocked up feeling so bad (ie not eating much!). I have lost weight though already- thats the problem. I'll need to see a nutricianist.
Hope you have a great week too Loie :0)

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Hi Camea,
Welcome to the group! I am glad to hear that you are learning from the people here and feeling better already. I have learned so much from all the information here and it has greatly affected how I eat and how I feel. My doctor gave me a partial list of what not to eat, but didn't tell me what I could eat. Through painful trial and error I found what works for the most part for me. In my case it's best if I stick to liquids. I knew about soy protien/fruit juice shakes. But the suggestion to try slimfast did not occur to me until I saw it here. And now it is a mainstay of my diet. I have gained a bunch of weight on this restricted diet that I don't really understand. I think in part because I don't feel well alot and therefore don't exercise as much (rarely) as I did before. And I wonder if my metabolism slowed down along with my insides. Maybe from the year I couldn't eat at all and got so skinny? Anyhow I can't imagine life anymore without the people here. When I am on this sight I feel normal. Because to have all these issues is normal to us!
Nancy

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