Which chemo. doesn't make your hair fall out?

I am on Navelbine chemo right now and it does not make hair fall out (thank heavens!). I was originally on Taxol/Avastin when first dx and did lose hair. But now I am just curious are there very many chemo treatments that won't make your hair fall out. My onc. told me way back when first dx that I have to look at my disease as a "chronic condition" that will always need to be treated. So I am thinking ahead for when/if the navelbine stops doing it's thing, what might other chemos be like. If anyone is on one that doesn't make hair fall out, please let me know. I understand that my onc. will recommend the best one for my situation, but if I were remotely given a choice, it would be nice to know which one to choose. Thanks ladies!

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Almost all normal cells grow and die in a controlled way through a process called apoptosis (cell death). Cancer cells, on the other hand, keep dividing and forming more cells without a control mechanism to induce normal apoptosis.

Anticancer drugs destroy cancer cells by stopping them from growing or dividing at one or more points in their growth cycle. Chemotherapy may consist of one or several cytotoxic drugs that kill cells by one or more mechanisms.

Conventional cancer drugs are a sledgehammer. They are supposed to kill "all" rapidly dividing cells whether they are out-of-control cancerous ones or healthy ones that naturally grow quickly, like those lining the mouth and stomach. That's why chemo causes hair loss, nausea and mouth sores.

Targeted cancer drugs are believed to act only upon cancer cells that have a specific genetic defect. However, cancer cells have many genetic defects (mutations) in many different pathways (mechanisms), so even if one route or two is shut down by targeted treatment, the cancer cell may be able to use other routes.

Conventionally, medical oncologists rely on clinical trials in choosing chemotherapy regimens. But the statistical results of these population-based studies might not apply to an individual. For many cancers, more than one "standard" treatment exists. What's good for the group (population) may not be good for the individual.

Instead of blindly mixing and matching drugs to individual cancer patients, what would be more beneficial is to sort out what's the best profile in terms of which patients benefit from this drug or any other drug. Can they be combined? What's the proper way to work with these drugs?

A genetic profile examines a single process within the cell or a relatively small number of processes. The aim is to tell if there is a "theorectial" predispostion to drug response. Gene profiling involves the use of dead, formaldehyde preserved cells that are never exposed to targeted drugs. It cannot tell us anything about uptake of a certain drug into the cell or if the drug will be excluded before it can act or what changes will take place within the cell if the drug successfully enters the cell.

A functional profile examines not only for the presence of genes and proteins but also for their functionality, for their interaction with other genes, proteins, and processes occurring within the cell, and for their response to anticancer drugs. Functional tumor cell profiling involves testing living (fresh) cancer cells, and assesses the net result of all cellular processes, including interactions, occurring in real-time when cancer cells actually are exposed to specific anticancer drugs. Functional profiling can also identify synergies in drug combinations.

Today, we are able to combine targeted inhibitors with other drugs to maximise their effectiveness for patients, which combinations are best and in what sequence would they be most effective (without losing our hair - rapidly dividing cells).

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I remember my oncologist telling me that neither Avastin or Abraxine on their own would make my hair fall out, but together, yes, I would lose my hair. Of all the things I miss, I don't miss my hair the most, but I miss my hair. We will be tethered to some kind of treatment forever with stage IV. I have agreed to continue the same treatment for the next 3 months - oh, the long hot summer wearing the wig at work! Turn up the air conditioning!

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Looking forward to hair loss is one of my biggest nightmare-inducing concerns (leaving two kids motherless tops the list at #s 1 through about 2,000,000 on the list, however).

I've read about something called 'penguin caps'...it's a frozen hat of sorts that you wear while receiving IV chemo and it saves your hair. Now, I realize not all hair loss chemos are IV, but I was wondering if anyone has any experience or success with this item...seems like I could deal with a cold scalp if it saved my blonde locks...

Hang in there ladies, something new is just around the bend, and I think that stupid alligator is looking the other way....

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Here are some of the drugs that I have been on for Her2Nu positive, ER negative, that do not make your hair fall out. Some of these are more traditional chemos, some are newer, targeted therapies. This is just a synopsis of my experience with hair loss or lack there of. I have lost my hair three times, but presently, I am happy to say that it is back, attached, and just newly coifed! We girls do love our hair! I know that the researchers are working hard to find less toxic yet effective drugs. I know the drugs are coming.
No hair loss:
Herceptin
Gemzar
Tykerb
Xeloda
TDM-1 (still in study, great drug)

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i agree Xeloda no hair loss, i took it for about 6month but i am on 2nd dose for Gemzar and Carbolatin, doc said 50/50 chance is their any one with the same chemo?

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I was on taxotere along with xeloda and my hair got very, very thin, but did not fall out.

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I HATED losing my hair but i imagined the cancer dying with each strand that fell out. When it started to grow back during chemo (TAXOL) i was actually scared the chemo wasn't working. I really do not relish going hairless again but now i know how to draw on some dang good eyebrows (: D

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Barb366... So how do you draw some "dang" good eyebrows? I need help.

I'm currently on Xeloda and Avastin. My hair is growin back very thin.. looks and feels like 6 month old baby hair. I just put a little gel and spike it up and go on my merry way. Get a few odd looks.. but no biggie. I'm hoping to get enough hair and will go for the Audrey Hepburn hairstyle!

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For me the answer was tan eye shadow not a pencil then mix in a bit of darker brown shadow and make the most of any brow hair still hanging on....sort of like bald guys do with a comb over LOL.

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Regarding the eyebrow question, which is a bit vexing, I found a wonderful eyebrow stencil set at "Sephora", the large makeup store at many malls. The brand of the set is "Anastasia" (www.anastasia.net). The set is terrific. I bought the Ash Blonde Brow set. My hair is brown with some highlights, when I have it. I feel so much better with eyebrows. I also found that eye shadow and eye liner really helped. Good luck.

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