DOES SMOKING CAUSES BLADDER CANCER -FYI

I forgot an important feature the doctor mentioned when he did my first cystoscope and told me I had cancer in my bladder.
He said " Do you smoke".? I quit smoking about 16 years ago because my granddaughter begged me to stay alive and quit smoking.
I thought I would be clean from smoking after all those years. Apparently not. My lungs may have been but it did effect my bladder per my urologist.

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Smoking is probably potentially a factor of any kind of cancer. Knowingly putting these toxins into our bodies is just asking for trouble!

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I can agree on that now, but when I smoked it was many years ago and the fact I was a 1 pack if that a day. I was never told it would cause cancer. I guess it would just about cause any kind of cancer. I just happened to get this because the urologist said your bladder filters out the toxins. So I got full blast. thanks for responding.

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I know this will stir up a lot of controversy, but food for thought ... I too still smoke some. I've cut down a lot and am back to much less than a half-a-pack a day now, but I was told the same thing that smoking is one of the primary causes of bladder cancer. Now the interesting point. My husband's chiropractor went to a seminar held by a group of MD's and DO's, all alternative medicine doctors. They said that there is no evidence that smoking causes cancer. It causes other things and does damage the lungs with things like COPD and emphsyema and can cause damage to the heart, veins, etc., but according to them there is NO evidence that cigarette smoke causes cancer. I have to wonder if this is true, how the bigshot lawyers have won so many lawsuits against the cigarette manufacturers. I also have to wonder how they won in the first place because I believe that smoking is a personal choice a person makes and we all have to take responsibility in one way or another for the choices we make and yet the cigarette manufacturers were to blame?

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I completely agree with you. It is our choice and I guess if you enjoy it, You want to enjoy it. I have told my grandson about the chewing tobacco. But he said it is one thing in life he enjoys.
Tobacco maybe a cause for something. But I remember when it was told if you eat chicken, it could cause cancer, Drinking diet drinks causes cancer. I can't remember all the things they have posted about it. But it just suprised me that the urologist- doing my cystoscope and looks around the sheet and said "do you smoke'. How embarrasing. He must know something. THat is when he told me I had bladder cancer, first stages and we caught it in time. just amazing isn't it.

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I am a firm believer that 33 years of smoking pleasure, cost me my bladder.......

15 months smoke free, and don't miss being a slave to a cigarette.

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While I agree that smoking is a personal choice, it becomes a choice that affects us all in terms of health care costs. I do not believe there can be any real doubt on a scientific basis that smoking is a major risk factor, whether or not we get hung up on calling it a cause or not, for numerous cancers including bladder, kidney, lung, and stomach and in some instances in combination with other risk factors almost assures you if you don't die of something else first you will get a particular cancer. In addition to cancers, smoking is a risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular disease and therefore strokes and hear attacks, and other chronic long diseases, the most common of which is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (emphysema and chronic bronchitis) which are equally deadly. A huge fraction of those in hospitals and being treated for chronic diseases are in these categories. As a non smoker, I certainly know that one can get bc without smoking and it can be dreadfully serious, but that does not erase the fact that about 50% of bladder cancers are smoking related. As far as oral tobacco use goes, I would encourage those who dip and chew to cease. The oral cancers that are associated with this practice, though less common than the cigarette associated diseases, are very difficult to treat and result in disfiguring surgery when they can be surgically cured. I'll now step down from my soap box. Best wishes to all,

jj

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The biggest common factors uniting bladder cancer victims are age, being male, and smoking. Whether the smoking directly causes cancer, or simply causes damage that leads to the cancer developing hardly matters. If a large percentage of victims of BC smoke, it doesn't take rocket scientists to work out that there's probably a significant link.

I for one have never smoked...but I grew up with a father who did. So for 18 years I lived with continual second-hand smoke. Granted that was over 30 years ago, but some estimates are that this can take 20-30 years or more to develop.

As for the seminar you cite, those people are certainly entitled to their opinion... but I'm not buying it. Until they can show me why so many smokers develop BC, if the smoking isn't a factor, I'm not wasting my time. I have fighting and surviving to do.

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Annamarie, your comments about not being told smoking could "cause" cancer reminds me of an incident a few years ago. My daughter bought some old issues of Life Magazine from an antiques store. The magazines were mostly from the 1940's to early 1950's. There were advertisements for cigarettes that you would not believe! Supposedly, smoking was GOOD for you, relaxing and energizing. It was so funny, yet at the same time tragic. Even when it began to be known that smoking was bad for us, the information was denied or suppressed for many years by the big tobacco companies with very deep pockets.

Blue Tiger, at the time of my diagnosis I was young and had never been a heavy smoker. I had quit many years before, and obviously I was never a male! I believe the main cause of my tumor was environmental carcinogens I was exposed to on the job for 17 years.

None of us are perfect and very few people have no bad habits, so I will not be throwing any stones! But jj makes a very valid point about the costs of smoking
affecting everyone as far as health care costs.

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My father quit smoking 4 years ago, he had histoplasmosis, but the doctors were throwing around lung cancer as the diagnosis. He quit that same day, cold turkey. never had another cigarette again. He was up to 3-4 packs that day.

When we had our appointment with Steinberg he told my father straight out that his cancer came from smoking. I have to agree with the doctor on this one. Smoke contains carcinogens, when you take in carcinogens, there's a chance you develop carcinoma.

We have plans to take out the carpets, buy new furniture, repaint the walls and of course, no smoking in the house or the cars, or around dad period. I used to tell people that I just hadn't found a good enough reason to quit smoking yet, and I finally have.

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thank all of your for such good responses and they all make sense. We too are fighting a battle around us whether we smoke or not. My youngest great grandson is 4 and when he came to Florida to visit he was exposed to the smoking, (not from me-but his grandmother along with the many dogs she has. By morning he was wheezing so bad that my granddaughter had to take him to the hospital where he was admitted. Doctors said at first it was from the smoking but that just triggered an asthma attack. From then on when he gets anywhere near a cigarette he goes into attack. My granddaughter moved into an 2 bedroom apartment and the ac that is in the hall, still has fumes being sent out into the apartment. She has to periodic wash down the walls in the ac unit, change filters almost every 2 weeks and since then he is on a nebulizer.
I am so glad I quit when I did. From now on, nobody smokes around him, no dogs around him. It is awful to see a 4 year old suffer like he did. I love dogs and would love to have one.. but my grandson is much more important. His grandma understands know and she is sorry, but still smoking. I keep reminding her look at me. I quit so many years ago and still I got the cancer. The sad thing is he loves the pet store. We attempt to go through it, but he started wheezing very bad and so did my granddaughter. I guess it runs in the family. I am wondering just how it will affect him later on as he gets older with smoking all around us. I know it is the choices we all go through and I am not knocking anybody that still does. My best friend had a bad medical problem but she said that she knew she was going to die and if smoking made her happy she wasn't going to quit. She did quit in the hospital just before she passed on.
well not really, she just couldn't smoke in there.. Nor in the hospice house.
We can only make our own choices. I am so glad I quit when I did. I smoked but didn't inhale for 6 months. really. LOL like Clinton said about pot. LOL
Sorry I got on the band wagon and said my speech. But this web site just lets you get it all out doesn't it. thanks for listening.

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Yes 15yrsurvivor, I fail the 'male' test too lol. Not male, never smoked, only risk factor I have is being over 55. Yes, I've heard that some chemical exposures can create a risk too, but I've never been knowingly exposed to them. So I attribute my BC to either second hand smoke, or just plain bad luck lol.

Whichever, I have no doubt that smoking is a habit that's probably best broken, if only because of the expense of it, aside from the medical aspects. Back when Dad smoked they were $10 a CARTON. They cost just a little bit more nowadays.

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I remember visiting the Adirondack Museum, with an extensive exhibit about Tuberculosis because people used to go up there to the sanitoriums (for the air). The most stricking photo was taken in January, snow all over (this is Saranac NY - bad winters!), and patients bundled up out on the porch.... smoking.

but I have to wonder, if the "I miss my Lung, Bob" ads didn't get Kids to think twice about smoking, maybe someone at the beach in a scanty swimsuit with an external pee-bag would give someone pause.
ok, i apologize for the visual (at least i didn't say 'speedo'). (oh, i just did, didn't i).

Well, we quite 20-some years ago, but had smoked a lot before that.

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I will never know why I got bladder cancer at age 42. I have never smoked, not even exposed to second hand smoke. My tactful doctor said " sometimes "Sh" just happens". Nice!

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I am now 72 years old. I started smoking at age 19. Got up to 4 packs a day and quit when my daughter was born – 41 years ago. I was diagnosed with BC in 2003. Since that time I have had 15 TURBTs.

My maternal grandfather died of pancreatic cancer. My maternal grandfather died of a brain tumor. My father, who smoked, died of mesothelioma. My mother, who also smoked, never had any form of cancer.

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The simple answer for me is YES, smoking caused MY bladder cancer, even though I quit many years ago. Is smoking bad for us? Yes!

I was perfectly healthy, running marathons and living life when I was diagnosed. The only logical explanation was the build up of toxins after 30+ years of smoking.

I don't believe one can ever quit too soon... If you're trying to quit and stumble, try again. You'll get there eventually.

Bob

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Yes I have Bladder Cancer caused by smoking. When I was dx in Jan 2007, the first thing the uro asked me was how much I smoke? I had quit 4+ years previous so he asked how much DID I smoke? 10 Turbs in 3 years has made me wish I had NEVER smoked.

My SIL had major surgery to remove the lower lobe of her right lung and wedge out a tumour from her upper right lobe. She is now under 16 weeks of chemo. She has smoked for apprx 40 years. Her mother smoked and died of lung cancer. Her 1st husband died of esphogus cancer at 42 years old, also a heavy smoker.

Smoking causes many types of cancers.

If you fail at quitting, never give up trying. It will stick at some point.

P.S. My uro said that my tumours could have been growing for years, including the years that I did smoke, before they showed up as blood in my urine. I had 3 very large tumours and 2 smallers ones removed during my 1st TURB. 2 the size of a quarter and one the size of a nickel. All had been growing for a long time.

And I have a friend who was dx with Bladder cancer. His uro said he would remove the tumours when my friend quit smoking. He quit that day.

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I have to say I was a smoker....though for many years a light smoker..but I smoked. The day my uro diagnosed me with BC I told him I guess it did not make any difference and he said yes it will if I quit...I have never smoked since. It has been 10 months this month and I had no problem quitting because I wanted to live and I could possibly do that if I helped myself. I grew up in a 2 parent family of nonfilters each of them smoking at least 2 packs a day....and most of my family smoked. But regardless I believe it certainly contributed to my BC so I take the responsibility for that. I am blessed that I have had no problem quitting and with God's help it was certainly made easier. It is a serious addiction and I often wonder why smoking cigs is legal...drinking is legal but they worry about pot and other drugs. Why not take cigs and liquor out of the mix..................as well.

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I too have mixed feelings about this subject. My mother died of lung cancer at age 70, diagnosed at age 67....she smoked from age twenty two to about age fourty...for all intense and purposes, her lungs were "clean as a whistle". Bert got diagnosed with stage III colon cancer 7 years ago, beat the beast, and now has bladder cancer...he quit smoking well over 20 years ago. I have many first related relatives that literally smoked to their graves and died of plain old age. Go figure. It's a thought that forever is in my mind as I too, like so many others, smoked but have quit. There is no doubt in my mind that smoking causes something but what that something all is or isn't, is unclear to me. My two cents worth :o) Monika

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Second hand smoke also can give you bladder cancer. That is how I got it.

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When we were young, we honestly didn't know smoking was bad for us. Now it is very clear that it is - and yet we see teens already addicted and not caring that it may kill them. Why????

I spent many years doing research on lung cancer, and there's no question that smoking causes lung cancer. As for other cancers, smoking may not directly cause them, but it will change cells to allow cancer to grow. Some people are more resistant to this than others, hence some will develop cancer and others not.

Bottom line, why take the chance? I'm so impressed with those of you who have been able to quit!
Eileen

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