Need another source of income

So I'm currently working at Blockbuster and the job is great but problem I only have enough energy to work at maximum 30 hours a week and when I head to university this winter I won't be able to juggle both school and work. So, I need to find some source of income that I can make from home. I'm great with the internet and I have excellent sales skills and experience for my age, does anyone have any ideas of how I can make some cash on the side?

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eBay and Craigslist. Go out and rummage through yard sales on the weekend, pick up some junk, and sell it on eBay. There are people that make a living do that. Maybe I should start doing it too...

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Hi Zac:

I think I saw you at the conference in San Diego, but I don't think we met. So, hello! I was thinking about your issue. I was not able to work & go to school when I was in college due to health issues. I focused 100% on school and got on public assistance. (SSI, though I think this is irrelevent to you since you are Canadian.) Is there any way you can afford to focus just on school? School takes a lot of time and energy and there's nothing more important than your education. In fact, one of the main factors in health and longevity is education level. (Meaning that people with more education live longer and healthier!)

I realize that I'm not really answering the question that you asked. So, I had a few ideas.
1) Tutoring: I missed a lot of high school, and my math skills are terrible. I had tutoring in Algebra and Geometry through a college-age family friend. Are there any subjects that you're really good at? You can advertise around just by word of mouth, on Craig's List, or by sending out an e-mail with a clever pitch and ask people to forward it around the local area. Perhaps even working with young people who are learning disabled. I'm sure there are many parents willing to pay an intelligent college student like yourself to help their kid through school.

2) Teaching older folks computer skills:
Just having watched my parents get their first computers in the last few years, tells me that there are many retirees who want to get online. But they need help with everything from choosing the right computer, hooking it up, using a mouse, etc. A lot of older people have time and money and family members dying to e-mail them or use skype, and that's where you could come in. Obviously this is not something you can do from your home, but maybe it would work anyway.

3) Build websites for friends: Last but not least, do you have any family friends with small businesses? If so, check out their website and, if you can build websites, maybe you can talk to them about updating their site or making a new site for them. Look at what they've got now, develop a business plan on how you can improve it & what you'd charge, and run it by them. There's a lot of bad websites out there, and with the right approach this might work out for you.

OK, so those are my ideas. Good luck! Let us know what you end up doing.

Best,
Fran

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Hi Zac,

There are a lot of fun and great businesses you can do from home to create some extra income. In order to ensure the best "health" for our kids, we decided that I should be at home. So I quit my corporate job of 20 years. I still needed to create some part-time income and did not want to leave the house much at first till I got some things taken care of.

After doing some research, I chose to augment my income by working with others to improve their health & wealth. Here is my team website: www.MakeMoreGreen.com. If you are interested in hearing some more information about what I do, just "request information" in the upper right corner.

OR if it is not really "up your alley" or does not meet your criteria, I'd be happy to refer you to other people, websites, businesses, resources that I checked out in my decision process. Maybe one of those would suit you better....

Take care and good luck!

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Zac,
I wonder if you could apply for any grants specifically for people with illness? (For instance, I'm a writer and there are organizations that award money to writers whose illness keeps them from working.)

I'd also set up a meeting with your university's financial-aid officer; I have a friend who asked his university's financial-aid person if the college offered any illness-based grants or knew of any organizations that would help out--and the college was more than happy to come to his aid. I have another friend who basically asked for an extra $2,000, based on her income, and her university just gave it to her--universities have a lot of money and they don't necessarily advertise that they'll help, but often they will.

This is also probably obvious--so, sorry about that!--but tell everyone you know that you're looking for work from home.
good luck!
Bunny

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The other suggestions have been great. Remember, you haven't been particularly strong of late, so you don't want to do too much and burn yourself out.

With your internet skills, you might be able to find something as a webmaster somewhere. IN fact, you could ask at your college and see if there are any jobs working with computers where you could work off part of your college costs. Perhaps, some of your professors would need you to do some computer work for them (as long as it wouldn't involve other people's grades, which would be a confidentiality thing).

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The world can always use more independent "geeks" who solve computer problems for folks without the time or background to do it themselves. Do a tear-off page with your business name and number. Post it at a laundry, coffee shop, etc.
Steve

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Hi Zac,

if you are "disabled"there is a place that you can check into that you could become a call taker for National Telecommucation Institute. http://www.nticentral.org/. I work seasonal for them. Hope that helps a bit:)

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Zac,

I am a Partylite (candles & accesories) consultant and make my own hours and decide how many parties I want to have and how much income I need and want to make. When I started I was not sure I could do it because sales and talking in front of people wasn't my strong suit but I did it and I have a blast with it! How many jobs do you know of that you can go and play games, give away prizes, drink some good wine or whatever your beverage of choice is and just have a good time with your friends? I pinch myself alot because it so hard to believe that I am having so much fun AND getting paid for it!! Where do you live? If you would like I could send you more informaton including a DVD to introduce Partylite to you and explain what a consultant does and how we make our money. You do not have to pay anything to start--you just hold a show and gross $350 at a show and your demonstration kit is yours free! Most parties average about $600 so it is an easy task to complete. Then after that you can decide how many shows you want to do (or book parties--they count too!) and watch the money start to roll in. Let me know if you are interested.

Michelle

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Of course, I missed the most obvious solution. You need to find yourself a red hot sugar daddy or sugar momma. The perfect sugar daddy/momma would have to be rich, gorgeous, and sweet as, um, sugar. I would volunteer for that role, but I'm not rich, I'm merely average, and I'm a sarcastic bitch.

Did you smile when you read this? Than it served its purpose.

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Hello Zac,

This is Tierney's mom from San Diego. Because Tierney spends so much time in the hospital, I am in a similar situation. I do not miss the corporate environment, however, being at home does not pay the bills. If you come across anything substantial, please feel free to share! Because we are a one-income family, I do not have any money to put forward to get things going.

God bless,
Tammy

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MarketAmerica. Where are you from? Canada? There should be some distributors in your area. Great health products. I'd help from here but there is a lot of one-on-one training.

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I really support Sanford's second recommendation!

For real though- I was in the same boat and couldn't work when I was in college due to energy. I was on SSI til I graduated and was able to get a job. Seriously this was enough money to get me the essentials in school and I was able to focus on my work (which was hard enough without burning myself out)
Seriously Zac, analyze the situation and see what will work best for you. If your health will be sacrificed, maybe it isn't worth doing both.

Hope you're feeling better each day. Talk to you soon.

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Just wanted to say thank you for all the help and I'm sure this thread will help out some other people out there if they check it out. Some really great information and I'm looking into a lot of them (even your second idea sanford...). Michdey and LorettaQ I sent you guys messages asking a few questions, your ideas sound great. It also looks like I might be able to do a bit of photography work, which would be great since I love it. Thanks to all!

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Hi Zac,
I have a friend that works from home selling QVC and making reservations for rent a car companies. She can work any hours she wants (24/7) and gets paid by the calls she handles. Calls are routed to her home on a rotating basis. As the calls come in she takes thier information and inputs it to the computer. If she is doing QVC she keeps the TV on to see what is being offered. A lot of shop a holics use it on a regular basis and all she needs is their customer # and the item # and size or color and she can be off the phone in 20 seconds and on to the next call. She ends up talking to people all around the country and she loves it. And she is in her 80s! When she wants to work she goes to her computer and signs on. The pay is based on certain (peak) hours are higher then others and it can be by the number of people available to take calls at that hour.
Nancy

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check into college jobs. most have students as employees , maybe something more restfull like the library, or being the person who watches over the computer lab or something that wont require physical exertion.

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Take the long term view and prioritise your education. You need to develop a specialist area (that you are passionate about!) so you can charge loads of money for your expertise. Aim to work for yourself, not anyone else, for job flexibility and maximum profit. Also anything that will generate you a passive income while you sleep is worth learning about (information products on the internet about your specialist area).

I have done some of this but not all of it yet so I'll go and continue to practise what I preach!

Kind regards Skinny (director of my own business based at home!)

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I sort of "fell into" my position as a rehabilitation aide. Due to the many medical appointments my child had and a shortened school schedule with alternate Fridays off from her Program, it became clear that a full time out of home job was not going to serve us well. I applied at our local rehabilitation aide and was accepted as a Family Services Worker. This was a very positive move for several reasons: I was able to maintain employment on my terms... Working days and hours accomodating our daughter's schedule AND I found such great satisfaction in being able to provide respite care to other children with developmental/medical needs! I absolutely love my work! You might try something similar... Perhaps matching with another young man with developmental needs as a Community Aide... Or, depending on your health and ability, offer respite within your own home doing activities that are pleasant for both of you and aid in the other person's skill development.

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